T O P
Motanul_Negru

I have a persistent HC that if you're the kind of person who would put a piece of their soul in, say, a random pebble and chuck that into the sea to be as innocuous as possible, you're the kind of person that can't or at least won't make a Horcrux even if you kill someone in cold blood. That a combination of grandiose sense of self and reckless disregard for one's own psychological (spiritual, if you will) well-being is needed, and it invariably leads to using a Fancy Shiny Object for the Horcrux, and usually to placing it in a suitably dramatic location. Now, if there *are* Horcrux users out there whose lives are kept going by something like my pebble in the sea, and they're just chilling and enjoying eternity discreetly, canon does not say; but my feeling is that it very heavily leans toward no.


ShadowMasterUvLegend

Exactly no rational being is making horcruxes. While Riddle was cunning, he was first and foremost a Dark Lord who viewed himself just short of God. It literally requires unaliving someone to make one of these objects. Followers bowing to him, his mark in the sky, being the heir of greatest of Hogwarts four, his mark on all his followers, those that oppose him end up losing everything.


amethyst_lover

Well, it depends. Are they trackable? Those kind of things are easily lost, and what happens if the soda can is recycled? (The soul piece ends up divided almost infinitely into a million other cans and thus is eliminated perhaps. 😄) It might work if the Horcrux can resurrect itself, but if it needs help, the "trash" hosts need to be findable and if given to someone like the locket, etc, it also needs to be something those not in the know won't toss. Maybe low end jewelry or something similar that doesn't stand out but won't be thrown out. Silver ring from a Muggle shop, for example.


Juliatchu

Aren’t horcruxes more or less indestructible? Otherwise Basilisk venom and fiend fire wouldn’t be needed? You can also just put a few charms on them that lead people (especially muggles) to overlook them and then throw it into the middle of the ocean.


amethyst_lover

True, true. And now I have a vision of Voldemort drowning or freezing because he reincarnated in the middle of the ~~North Sea~~ Arctic Ocean, up near the polar ice cap (or the equivalent down near Antarctica). The assorted spells and charms that would protect/warm him take time he doesn't necessarily have... (OK, going off to check survival rates in those circumstances. Could make a good crack fic!) *Arctic Ocean average water temp is apparently about 28.8 F. Hypothermia is vicious.


Juliatchu

Hypothermia really is vicious, and humans are pretty terrible at handling the cold even in dry conditions. I’m curious, has your google search given you anything about how long we could expect him to last? Although I have to wonder about how his snakyness affects that time. Snakes get a lot slower in the cold but they can also survive temperatures humans can’t.


amethyst_lover

My brief dip into it suggests less than 30 minutes at those temperatures. But after 10, the person gets sluggish, the extremities don't respond well (can't grip and pull cords on life jackets for example), and it's all downhill from there. Before I try writing anything, I'll research it a little better and definitely see what I can turn up about snakes and cold water. There are people who have incredible tolerances, however. I recently watched a video about the head baker on the *Titanic*, who survived with little more than frostbite on his fingers and toes despite having been in the water all night. The tribunal thought it might have had something to do with the alcohol he drank. But commenters on the video pointed out there are accounts of people with incredible tolerances and durability. If Tom Riddle had that, I would think introducing snake traits would negate it.


Juliatchu

Some people are naturally better equipped to handle cold (although I’d assume alcohol would do more harm than good as it actually widens the blood vessels in your skin, thus making you lose heat even faster). Brown fat helps for example but since I’m pretty sure Tom isn’t the descendant of any Inuit it’s rather unlikely that he has any of the mutations that would help him (some of those mutations also make someone less sluggish I think). Although wizards being tougher than muggles is a possibility that might give him an advantage. Wandless magic is also a possibility, he was able to do quite a bit before he even turned eleven and in a life or death situation it would probably be a bit easier since that’s when accidental magic usually happens.


amethyst_lover

You're quite right about the effects of alcohol, but of course back in the day the false warming sensation it gave was considered genuine (hence hot toddies and St Bernard dogs with casks, etc). The big concern would be how much time would he lose during the initial reaction? A lot of energy and heat is lost when people flail about because they're suddenly not only in water but freezing cold water. In fact, one website said it's best if you can just float rather than tread water or that reason. So if Voldemort keeps his head and doesn't lose a lot of time, he might be able to save himself. (although exploring the accidental magics that might happen in this situation would also be a good idea) Otherwise, if he can't, scratch one life--lost quietly and unnoticed to the icy waters of the Arctic Ocean.


Juliatchu

I feel like he might be able to make it if he was expecting it and prepared for all of it. Getting yourself a body after spending over a decade as a disembodied spirit seems like it would be disorienting on the best of days (teenagers manage to trip over their own feet after growing a few centimeters already, imagine getting an entire body in an instant) and I can’t imagine getting resurrected in the middle of the ocean would make it any better. If he knew what was going to happen he might be ready to act in a way least likely to result in a frozen corpse and to quickly use magic to save his not-yet-frostbitten-arse but if it happened unexpectedly I’d not be surprised if he spent a few precious minutes flailing around like a slightly insane and undoubtedly murderous newborn. Of course accidental magic could still save his life (we know Harry accidentally apparated when he was a child before ever knowing about magic after all), not knowing what was going on and being very distressed might even help with that. Although long distance apparation seems harder and might be beyond his abilities, which could be a pretty big problem in the middle of the ocean.


PlusMortgage

Considering that half of the Founders Heirlooms were considered as lost before Voldemort used them as receptacle, I'm not sure it is that stupid. But even if it was, Voldemort chose these items because he was arrogant, his arrogance is pretty much his only weakness. If you somehow made Voldemort humble (while staying Evil), he would probably chose other items, but it would also make a boring story because he would have won before Canon. Also, people seem to forget an important point about Voldemort mentality, he feared Death. That's one of the reason why he decided to make several Horcruxes, and that's the reason why he wanted to always be able to check on his Horcruxes. Creating a pebble Horcruxe and throwing it somewhere in the Ocean might work, but Voldemort would never be able to accept it. The uncertainty of now knowing if his Horcrux was still there or not would make him crazy. So better use important items in checkable places.


Juliatchu

Tbf, unimportant objects in certain locations would still be an option. Like, make the whole cave and put Slytherins locket into the basin and all that but in reality it’s just a rock next to it that’s the Horcrux.


ihatemaryfisher

This is discussed in the book. It’s brought up that his horcruxes could be tin cans, or garbage. Dumbledore says something like “No, you’re thinking of Portkeys. Voldemort would not entrust his soul to such mundane objects.” Besides, the Horcruxes have a tendency to be found out. The diary—probably the most mundane horcrux—made its way from Lucius to Ginny to Harry. Nobody knew it was a horcrux until after it was destroyed. I.E., the horcruxes have some influence on the world


rfresa

So even if it were a pebble chucked into the sea, that would be the pebble that some diver picked up and which then found it's way to end up stuck in Harry's shoe. Fate is at play.


ihatemaryfisher

Basically. But not because of fate. The stone would find a way. Similar to how the ring from Lord of the Rings made it’s way from Gollum to Bilbo


BoyScoutReddit

He’s not (just) stupid, he’s arrogant, and Rowling made sure to point that out in the text. Dumbledore (if I’m remembering correctly) describes him as too full of himself to leave a piece of his soul in just any old thing. In short: it’s a character flaw, not a plot hole.


hydraxl

It’s soul magic. My head canon is that it has to be something emotionally significant enough for his soul to stay in it. If it could have been anything, Dumbledore wouldn’t have known to search for important objects like he did.


Mughilan128

Dumbledore says that there is no need to search for ordinary stuff because Voldemort would never "entrust his soul to mundane objects"


hydraxl

Meaning he’s egotistic enough that the only objects he’s willing to form a strong enough emotional connection with to put his soul in are objects he considers extraordinary. It also explains why the diary could be a horcrux despite arguably being a mundane object. It also explains Nagini.


streakermaximus

Voldemort made several mistakes. Using an obscure spell no one has really heard of on objects thought lost to history can't really be considered one of them. Voldemort's real mistakes are making an enemy of Albus Dumbledore. And attacking a kid named Harry Potter is a book series called Harry Potter. It's Evil Overlord 101, don't make an enemy of The Hero!


AtomicSquare24

The other commenter brought up some good points… Voldemort wouldn’t exactly be able to easily reincarnate himself if his horcruxes aren’t unique items. For the same reason someone hunting the horcruxes wouldn’t find it, finding that piece of soul to put in a homunculus is damn difficult when it’s in a random candy wrapper in a landfill. So by necessity, if he wants to continue being alive and having a body, he can’t make them generic. After all, he made the horcruxes not just to stay alive, but to give him a chance to return to a physical form that can use his magic as well. And if the items need to be unique, then it totally makes sense that Voldemort used what he did for them - his few personal possessions, such as the diary and the ring from his mother’s family; or legendary “lost” items (the cup, diadem, and locket) that nobody would suspect of being horcruxes, because they think those items lied untouched for centuries. Getting to those requires an intimate knowledge of his personal history, and the ability to retrieve these items that nobody’s found for hundreds of years except for Tom Riddle. Only Dumbledore could’ve figured it out, really. If Voldemort had survived the Second War, he’d be well and truly unkillable, since he would know exactly where his horcruxes are and be able to have his followers retrieve them, while anyone seeking to kill him wouldn’t know which items were the horcruxes.


mcc9902

Was it ever shown or implied that he needed a horcrux nearby to Rez himself? He was still wandering around as a spirit nowhere near any of them when he possessed what’s his name year one so he can certainly posses someone and while nagini was there for the Resurrection she wasn’t mentioned in relation to it at all as far as I recall.


amethyst_lover

AFAIK, the only Horcrux we saw try to do anything was the diary one and it was a slow process to take over Ginny--and that was the strongest one. The locket drove everyone insane (or tried to) but I don't think it was actually taking anyone over. Yes, it tried to drown Harry, but did it ever do anything else that physical? The wraith needed assistance and a ritual to get a permanent/better body. I extrapolate that prolonged exposure and interaction with a Horcrux would allow the soul to come back/possess a body, but it's not a quick process, much less instantaneous. The compulsion spells make sure contact is maintained. There probably is a ritual to speed it up, though.


rfresa

Theory: the item needs to already be enchanted to be able to allow the soul fragment to retain its magic and intelligence.


Sinhika

We all know that Tom Riddle never read the Evil Overlord List. He chooses significant objects for his horcruxes and leaves them in accessible places with exotic traps (which are just catnip for heroes), choses a face- AND body-concealing uniform for his minions, and goes with the name "Death-Eaters" for his minions. A sensible Dark Lord would make his primary soul anchor horcrux out of something durable, and then bury it in the foundation of a major public building. The horcruxes for taking over new bodies should be in the form of something durable that is likely to be passed to a useful subject to body-snatching. The diary was actually pretty clever, unlike the rest of his horcruxes. Never put your soul into a giant snake that you keep by your side. If your enemies can endanger your current body, they can kill your snake.


Daemon-Blackbrier

No.


DLR-OS

I think a lot of people are underestimating Voldemort on this. Most of his Horcruxes were not easily found and mostly only gotten through some shenanigans. The Locket hinged on their plan of taking hair from well known people within the Ministry and staging an infiltration mission with limited intel and very few chances to observe the people they were impersonating and it all hinged on the fact that they chose people who could freely move about the DE controlled Ministry, one without question in Runcorn. The Cup was hidden in the bowels of Gringotts and gotten on a hastily concocted plan involving liberal use of the Imperius Curse, the Inivisibility Cloak and a rogue goblin that was promised the Sword of Gryffindor for payment and required the group escaping on the back of a surprisingly docile and blind dragon that had been abused and used for guard duty in the depths of an underground bank. The Diadem, which had been lost for 1000 years was found almost completely by luck and could have been lost if Harry stayed to torture a Death Eater for overly long, and the Room of Requirement was reconned in that moment anyways due to it opening for the Trio despite Malfoy already occupying it. It literally only became accessible because Rowling changed how the Room worked on the fly. I'm not going to say it should have been impossible, but I will say it should not have gone as smoothly as it did.


reddog44mag

I agree that he could have picked better objects and more importantly should have picked better hiding places. However, consider this, by using the Founders heirlooms he was hoping that would cause anyone who found them to be much more reluctant to destroy them. As who wants to be known as the individual that destroyed Ravenclaw's lost diadem? Then add the protections on the items themselves that also had compulsions to use/wear them. By using such valuable Founders heirlooms you get that initial hesitation when you first see it which may allow the compulsions to work at which point the other protections/curses would "take care of the problem". To some extent that's what happened to Dumbledore (unplanned by Voldemort) when he saw that the Gaunt ring was really the Resurrection Stone that hesitation (plus Dumbledore's own desire for the stone) allowed the compulsion to work. By not using such priceless pieces there would be less hesitation to destroy them. My biggest complaint was where he hid them. All locations that meant something to his past. I would have hidden them as far away from locations of my past. And one (encased in stone and with protections) would have been placed in the Mariana Trench. Making the likelihood of it being found negligible. At least one other would have been hidden on the continent rather than have all of them hidden in the UK. But we all know why that didn't happen JKR Plot reasons because if the villain is really intelligent/cunning then the odds of a kid defeating him drops drastically.


TheLetterJ0

>more importantly should have picked better hiding places. Yeah, like maybe some obscure cave in the middle of nowhere with a bunch of magical protection, or a room no one knows about full of all sorts of random objects, or in the most secure vaults in the world... Oh, wait.


reddog44mag

One problem it was known that while Voldemort was at the orphanage they had taken a trip to the sea and that there was an incident in a cave. How else do you think Dumbledore knew to search the cave? And with all the various belongings in there without knowing how it all came to be placed there it was nothing but pure arrogance to believe you are the only person to know about it. Turns out all of the elves in Hogwarts knew about the room so that means anyone who thought enough to ask the elves would have been led straight to the room. So yes, he needed to pick better locations.


TheLetterJ0

>it was nothing but pure arrogance Exactly. Voldemort's flaw is arrogance, not stupidity.


reddog44mag

His arrogance caused him to take a stupid action by hiding something in a room that could be accessed by anyone once you discover it and the easiest way to discover the room is asking any Hogwart's elf. So you go to the kitchens and ask them for a room to train, or a room to hide something, or a room where you could find useful stuff etc. And it's likely they show you to the Come and Go room. Now in all honesty as far as we know in canon only Voldemort and harry found it. Though without knowing how all the stuff got in there it's possible others found it at least once but never found it again. We are going to have to agree to disagree. I believe that Voldemort was stupid to hide his horcruxes in locations that held some meaning for him. Especially when as a wraith he could still communicate with one of his followers so if need be he could guide them to a Horcrux to revive him. Especially when two of them were already in the hands of his trusted followers. So the others could be hidden anywhere. By hiding them in meaningful locations anyone who researched him would be pointed at these locations. I think another commenter mentioned the Evil Overlord list. One of the Austin Powers movies had a line in it that picked on the stupidity of all the Bond movies and their convoluted methods of killing him. When Dr. Evil told Austin Powers how he was going to kill him his son pretty much goes "What! Look I've got a gun in my room. I'll go up and get it then we'll shoot him and bang he's gone." And he's turned down and Austin Powers escapes. I think Voldemort's hiding of his horcruxes in meaningful locations is similar to the above i.e., not the smartest decision.


TheLetterJ0

Unlike in fanfics, no one is likely to ask a house elves for a place to train or hide something. And even if they did, the elves wouldn't be likely to show them the RoR. Dobby showed it to Harry because he was loyal to Harry and Harry specifically needed to not be found by anyone. If a normal student was trying to hide from the teachers, the elves would probably side with the teachers. And if they wanted somewhere to train, they'd show them the same normal rooms the teachers would. And yes, other people definitely found the room. That would have been obvious to Voldemort from all the stuff in it. But he thought he was the only one who knew how it worked. That was his arrogance. And he wouldn't have had any reason to think that the elves specifically knew anything about the room anyway. Besides, but even if you somehow knew that a horcrux was in the RoR, you'd never be able to find it. You would basically need to fiendfyre the whole room, which he would be right to assume is very unlikely to happen. So it's just as effective as using a rock and dropping it in a forest or something. And as for the cave, it was connected to Voldemort's past, but in such an obscure way that you'd probably have to be Dumbledore specifically to have any chance of figuring it out. It's about as connected to Voldemort's past as a middle school field trip where you had your first kiss would be to someone in their sixties. And even if Dumbledore did find the cave, canon proves that the protections in the cave would probably have been enough to defeat him (if he had been alone, but failing to account for the help of a child or elf was that arrogance again), and Voldemort would have been happy with Dumbledore finding his horcrux and then dying in the cave.


ceplma

I have made fun with the alternative way of this thinking (same objects but different supposedly safer locations) in [this outline](https://matej.ceplovi.cz/blog/horcruxes-and-unhappy-dark-lord.html).


aw_jeez_idunno

I found this outline intriguing because it presents the possibility that magical and/or dark forces can be destroyed using non-magical methods. After reading this, my headcanon is this: horcruxes can be destroyed by natural forces (i.e. earthquakes, tsunamis, underwater pressure, lava, ect.) but not human methods like bombs and such.


ceplma

I think if we want to keep natural laws in actions, then difference between magic and non-magic is mostly matter of quantity. A wizard with a wand can create a shield which protects him against the impact of so-and-so Newtons (or whatever is the physical unit of an impact), protections on a Horcrux can sustain heat of so-many Kelvins, etc. Otherwise, that reality is just weird: a wizard surviving in the middle of an exploding A-bomb makes just too much Uncanny valley. There just must be some limits.


Holbrad

Hard disagree here. I think it's clear that magic doesn't work like this at all. If you want to quantify things down to joules and energy you can. But as has been pointed out by this sub before, wizards limits are truly ridiculous. Given the fact that they can create kilo's of matter (As students), that puts them well within the range of stopping a nuclear blast. (This isn't to say they necessarily could, just that they certainly have the energy to do so\*) Things get even more silly when you consider quantifying the potential energy of time space manipulation or time travel...(We would quickly get into requiring ?stars? worth of energy, I think it's clear that magic doesn't follow physical laws...)


aw_jeez_idunno

If this is the case then wouldn't wizards have powers so far ahead what muggles are capable of that the whole Statue of Secrecy thing becomes unnecessary?


NeutralDjinn

Interesting question. If Voldemort was the type of person to do that, would he have become so magically powerful in the first place?


Holbrad

I think it's far more interesting to take this in the other direction. Creating a Horcrux, is putting a piece of your soul within an object. It makes sense to me that the object has to have strong personal meaning to the caster. That object being something that the soul would have an affinity for or resonance with, rather than a random object. It's a novel restriction that can show emotional backstory though the object choice and importantly gives a justifiable but narrow weakness to Horcruxes.


Cmdrgorlo

The mindset of using Founder’s artifacts reminds me of Sauron’s forging of the Rings of Power. He could have used necklaces/amulets or even enchanted crowns or armor (everyone associated with The Rings except Galadriel was male), but chose to make precious rings. And yes, I am thinking of Gollum’s lines ‘my precious, the precious’ as to how Tom thinks of Nagini. And frankly, it makes sense he would want to use something as precious, historically valuable, and as magical as a Founder’s artifact. The magic in them, as well as the magical value and respect wizards and witches venerate the objects with, probably means that such magics were actually important in the creation of the Horcruxes.


SagittaMalfoy

Voldemort is a drama queen with crippling insecurities. Thus, he feels the need to Make A Statement with everything he does, especially the things concerning his soul


deadbenz35

Tbh still dont know why he used horcrux's when full on phylacteries are so much more efficeint.


rohan62442

The problem wasn't the objects he picked. The problem is that he chose to hide them in places linked to him in some way, some of them public places. He should've hidden them in places where nobody, not a soul living or dead, knew was connected to him in any way.


JamieTheDinosaur

You shouldn’t expect an insane person to make rational decisions.


berkeleyjake

My headcanon says that a receptacle for a horcrux needs to be significant to the person or the soul fragment won't bond to it. But in general, Voldemort is an idiot. So much of what he does could fill an entire section of The Evil Overlord List.