T O P
Alkalannar

Law 137: Military, police, company, or vigilante. How does the law apply to you? Subjects include different state/territory/country laws, with a focus on (home country here). Further subjects include the terms [_causus belli_](https://infogalactic.com/info/Casus_belli) and [_hostis humani generis_](https://infogalactic.com/info/Hostis_humani_generis), and how to avoid them being applied to you. Unless you want them to. Further classes in this sequence are more in-depth for particular countries, political unions, etc.. A course on extraplanetary law will be added once confirmed contact with alien civilizations is made. Philosophy 101: So you're [Neitsche's _Übermensch_](https://infogalactic.com/info/%C3%9Cbermensch)! Now what? A survey of ethics and morality, from Plato through Sartre, so that both heroes and villains may be properly philosophically grounded in arguments with each other, and justify their actions being taken. Other courses in this series include how to be, or avoid being, a religious figure. (Short version: Good luck with either.) See also the Religion/Comparative Religion department. PoliSci 101: Power Politics. Should superheroes serve the state? Should the state serve superheroes? Should superheroes create their own state? If so, how would it work?


MinidonutsOfDoom

A course on biofeedback would probably be quite useful to assist in power control, courses on ethics and philosophy for assisting their judgement on utilizing their powers, physical training when applicable, training on how to use their power for mundane purposes for applications in daily life when possible. Would be best to try and categorize their powers as well for helping to develop more specialized curriculums depending on the exact nature of their powers.


Mr_Flavescens

With a focus on the kind of things you would teach to children (as opposed to teens or adults) here are the first things that come to mind: **Meditation and Mindfullness training:** Start 'em young before they hit those crazy super-powered teenage moodswings. **Reading and Literature classes**: ostenabily to improve reading ability, the real purpose is to improve empathy. Choosing stories that focus on powerless heroes and children who live through adversity, literature is designed to widen their imagination to try and conceive of life from a non-superpower perspective. **"PE" stands for Puzzle Engagement**: instead of testing strength or speed, PE classes are obstacle courses, physical puzzles, mazes, capture-the-flag, find-the-treasure and other team-based challenges that force children to work together and use their powers in new ways. ​ I have to imagine if they are super-powered kids, there are also super-powered adults. If any of those powers involve telepathic abilities, there would be some adults who could accelerate a child's development by stepping into their mind or dreams and seeing the child's hangups, fears, and other troubles and compelling the child to face them (or supernatually eliminating them). This would likely lead to a fundamental split is super-power pedagogy: some teachers beleive that education should be enhanced and accelerated by the use of such powers, "Super-powered children need a super-powered education." Other teachers would insist that the most important thing about a super-powered human is their humanity, and that natural progression, even if it involves long delay, is essential, "Every human needs a teacher." ​ Of course, like most children, no matter how well-designed the school their favorite class will often be "lunch" or "recess."


Nephisimian

> ostenabily to improve reading ability, the real purpose is to improve empathy. In school, we had Of Mice and Men as a book assignment. To introduce the assignment, we first watched a movie adaptation as a class. The class next door was a couple of lessons ahead of us cos we were the dumb class, so they'd already done that. Towards the end of the story, there's a scene where the main character shoots a mentally disabled friend iirc to spare him from the consequences of the fact he accidentally killed someone. It's supposed to be this real emotional scene. When our class got to that point of the movie, the neighbouring class, who had clearly been listening through the wall, burst out in uproarious laughter, and tbh it was hilarious. Reading in school doesn't teach kids empathy. Pretty sure it just teaches them the most inappropriate things to find funny.


Mr_Flavescens

I think you're absoltuely right that reading doesn't teach empathy, and I think your example is excellent and one that a lot of people can relate to, myself included. However, there is more than one way to teach literature, and more than one way to interpret the numerous examples of children laughing at portrayals of drama or pain. You are very correct when you say reading doesn't teach empathy, but I believe imagination can. I firmly believe that the task of teaching literature is not about training reading and analysis, but an inspiring and directing the imagination. We naturally, and unavoidably, learn our values through stories. If your school was anything like mine, the fault was not the story itself but the storytelling. Of Mice and Men has the potential to be a very moving book. It has the potential to engage the imagination in new and interesting ways. However, telling the story through a mandatory movie viewing does not tend to engage the imagination. There is no sense of agency, creativity, or personal investment. There is little point or purpose beyond taking up class time. The story has nothing to do with you, it's something being done to you. It comes across as someone trying to make you feel something, which when it isn't cringey is boring and in the climactic moment it's so pathetic the most natural response in the world is to laugh. That's my interpretation. It's certainly not the only way to look at it, but I think literature in schools has great potential - though it is rarely recognized or taken advantage of.


Nephisimian

>You are very correct when you say reading doesn't teach empathy, but I believe imagination can. I'm not sure about that either. I was very imaginitive as a kid, to the point adults constantly commented on it. It took me until I was like, 16, to develop any real sense of empathy. I agree with your opinion that what English/literature classes in school should be doing is encouraging imagination, but I don't think doing that would increase empathy. I think empathy is something you learn by meeting and talking to new people, not by reading about them, because the way humans connect to real people is fundamentally very different to the way we connect to literature (particularly, if we don't find a story engaging, we'll just tune out, whereas we'll make much more active attempts to find engaging qualities about real people). I think this is also why even though pretty much everything you could want to know about anything is already available on the internet, there still seems to be an instinct in most people to ask another person about it instead of look it up - just look at the popularity of subreddits like r/ELI5. As for Of Mice and Men, frankly I think it's a bad book just on its own, but an additional problem was that this book about poor adult migrant workers and prostitutes with mental disorders and depression almost a century ago in America is just of absolutely zero relevance to middle class English teenagers. When we studied that book, I was barely even aware of what an "America" was - all I knew about it was shallow stereotypes like the lack of healthcare. There was no way of teaching this book that would have engaged me. It probably also wasn't helpful that since I was already a voracious reader, a semi-realistic historical fiction with unrelatable characters and literally nothing interesting going on would seem fantastically dull - to the degree of pointlessness - next to the sci fi and fantasy works I would have been comparing it to. Personally, I think English classes should be far more focused on creative writing than on literature analysis, putting analysis into the context of giving the students tools to create their own stories instead of just being able to recite essays about this one book. I think the only way to get kids past the "the idea of guessing what the author intended to mean by a sentence is comically stupid" stage is by giving them first hand experience of what "author intention" means.


Trekith

These are actually some dope ideas, thanks!


BribedSkeleton

Teach people how to use their superpowers why? Do they need them? Would it be dangerous or deadly for them if they didn’t? What do superpowers even do in this hypothetical? A normal school with a few special classes on superpowers would probably make more sense if we’re going from an education perspective granted this really depends on the setting


capt-yossarius

Communications 401: Why Every News Organization Will Refer To You As A Villain, No Matter How Much Good You Do


Nephisimian

Maths, biology, chemistry, physics. Probably a language or two. Maybe computer science or some kind of social studies. Perhaps an art or music subject. Too many people forget that a superhero school is still a school and the purpose of school is to set you up with a broad general knowledge. Realistically, you'd never get a magic school that only taught magic. Most class time would be spent learning what triangles are.


NYC_hydra

Really depends on the nature of the school, and the tone. I personally believe that superhumans are inherently supremacist, and use of their powers to fight people would be an inherent, so I don't think I'd give good advice. Think about the tone of your world, and what type of person does this school want to create. What is this world's view on superhumans?


Trekith

Why do you think that about superhumans?


NYC_hydra

Because, the idea of a "superior" person using there power to "protect" people from "evil doers" isn't a good one. They exert their will over society by nature of their own perceived supremacy. I don't want the fate of my world to be in the hands of those considered "superior" for their genetics or wealth. They view themselves as the benevolent masters of the "lesser" civilians, making decisions as to humanity's fate, instead of humans deciding that fate for ourselves, often making humanity's hardest decisions without even being human in any meaningful way. They decide what's right or wrong, and use violence (leathal or not) and support of the law (direct or not) to enforce their will upon society. If they were real, they'd be closer to feudal lords then anything else, they even usually have the banners and dynasties. And their goals are not uniformly right either. They're usually based on what society thinks is right. But that means that if Spiderman lived in the 15th century, he'd be "webbing up" heretics and adulterers for the inquisition. Mabye it's because I live in a city that superhero films regularly revel in the destruction of. Mabye its because my sexuality is outlawed in 71 counties. But I just don't have any desire for those creatures to be real, and would probably want them dead if they were. When I think of some Midwestern kid using a supposed supremacy to "clean up" cities, I don't think of a savoir, I think of a monster. TLDR: superheros use supremacy and violence to enforce the will of society. (This is just my personal opinion, I'd love to hear what you guys think.)


Beginning-Ice-1005

Dialogue 101: mastering the art of combat quips Law 101: or why beating up criminals and leaving them tied to a lamp post will probably not lead to a conviction Law 102: legal and civil law regarding collateral damage Business 101: how to copyright your image, without giving your identity away (to too many people) Psych 105: balancing secret identities and relationships


Usbcheater

Yoga: for concentrating and learning to work your body for the powers your about to use.


jadelemental

Power control and morality prolly.


MovieMaster2004

If every child has a different power, the way to teach them will be very inefficient unless the teachers have a way to replicate their powers or simulate it on a device to understand it first. The cost of an academy like that will be ridiculous. The only group learning experiences are about law and morality really.


Trekith

Well, the school would only teach general stuff, not specific stuff, but I guess a way for teachers to copy the powers would be very useful for 1 on 1 lessons.


MovieMaster2004

You should also keep in mind power activation. Does every superpower use emotions as fuel? Like anger makes you stronger but harder to control and stuff like that? Or they vary, some emotion based, some movement based, thinking based, etc.